Women’s Equality Day

Women’s Equality Day

August 26, 2019

Examining the present with a nod to the past.

On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was officially adopted, granting women the right to vote. This milestone was the result of a decades-long political movement that formally began in 1848 at the world’s first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York.

To celebrate Women’s Equality Day, we created placards to acknowledge the historical reality of the women’s suffrage movement in the United States and to highlight the progress that still needs to be made when it comes to women’s rights. Each placard represents an actual slogan used during suffrage marches in the 1900s, with an asterisk added to a single word on each: on “women” to call out the fact that the 19th Amendment only granted white women the right to vote; on “votes” to point out that women of color still face barriers to voting; on “liberty” to highlight restrictions that continue to be imposed on women’s reproductive health; and on “equality” to emphasize that women are still not equal to men when it comes to income and representation in Congress.